I Was Here by Gayle Forman

i-was-here“I regret to inform you that I have had to take my own life.”  That was the beginning of the letter Cody received from her best friend, Meg — sent via email, with a time delay to ensure that her suicide had been completed before anyone could try to stop her.  In that letter, Meg went on to apologize for the pain she knew she would cause the people who loved her but also to explain that she saw suicide as the only way to end her own pain.  Something else she said in that letter, nevertheless, led Cody to question what actually led Meg to kill herself.  She found it nearly impossible to believe that she had no idea her best friend would want to kill herself, and she set out to uncover the truth of whether this truly was a suicide or whether Meg had been somehow coerced.

I read this book a while ago, but actually forgot that I had read it when I was recently browsing through “available titles” on OverDrive…  All I remembered was that I had loved Gayle Forman’s writing in If I Stay and Where She Went, so I checked it out.  As I listened to it for a second time, though, I started to recall bits and pieces of the plot and felt compelled to keep listening in case there was anything else I had forgotten about the story.  Then it hit me that this would be a perfect book to share when #SuicidePreventionAwarenessMonth and #BannedBooksWeek overlapped.  Not only does this book inspire readers to think about and look for the possible warning signs of suicide, but it also helps to create a better sense of empathy for people who struggle with mental illness.  Rather than calling people “cowards” or “selfish,” we need to recognize the sense of helplessness that mental illness creates.  Hopefully, books like this will lead to a more open dialogue so that we can work to #EndTheStigma.

Happy Reading!

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