Category Archives: audiobook

Monument 14 [series] by Emmy Laybourne

Monument14Sorry I never posted a review last week.  I had every intention of finding a few minutes to post a review  but… well…  I was on vacation and I was just having too much fun with my family!  ;-)  We spent the week in NYC and did a variety of cultural, educational, and just plain fun stuff.  Every day was exhausting, but my son insisted that we still make time to read at least a chapter every night before we crashed at the hotel.  As much as I enjoy reading with my kid, it was a little creepy — because we were reading the dead & the gone, which is all about post-apocalyptic NYC!  And because we were reading that book, it reminded me that I had to finish the Monument 14 series (another post-apocalyptic story) when I got home.  So, I decided that would be the subject of my first post back.
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The Tragedy Paper by Elizabeth LaBan

tragedy-paperThis is another one of those books that I just cannot imagine reading from an actual book because it worked *so* well as an audiobook.  Although the plot is not even remotely the same, this audiobook actually reminded me of Thirteen Reasons Why because it had one narrator for the main character and another narrator for a person who left behind a recording.  I’m not sure what this says about me, but I really enjoy “listening in” on these recordings and the reactions they invoke from the main character!  ;-)  Continue reading

The Darkest Part of the Forest by Holly Black

darkest-part-of-the-forestHappy Teen Tech Week, everybody!  Before I get to the actual audiobook review, I would just like to take a moment to remind y’all that public libraries are about WAY more than just books.  Of course we lend out books and audiobooks — but we also lend music, movies, and video games.  Many public libraries even lend e-books and downloadable audiobooks FOR FREE via OverDrive.com!  As someone who listens to audiobooks ravenously, always has an ebook waiting on her Kindle, and is cheaper than cheap, this service is something I’m thrilled to take advantage of and to share with my library patrons and blog readers.  (There are even streaming video and magazines available now on OverDrive, though I haven’t fully explored those options yet.)   But, I digress.
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Ask the Passengers by A.S. King

ask the passengersWhen Astrid Jones and her family moved from New York City to Unity Valley, PA, none of them quite realized how drastically their lives would change.  Astrid’s mom became so concerned with how other people saw her and so controlling that it seemed nothing Astrid did was ever even close to good enough.  Her little sister, Ellis, was so concerned with popularity and upholding her reputation that she’d probably have disowned Astrid if it would have guaranteed her immunity from the rumor mill.  This apparently pleased her mom, though, since she frequently invited Ellis to “mommy and me” nights out.  And their dad?  When he wasn’t moping about his lack of job prospects and smoking pot in the garage or attic, he seemed content enough to sit silently while his wife belittled him in front of the kids. Continue reading

A Corner Of The Universe by Ann M. Martin

corner of the universeYou may have noticed that I am doing daily reviews this week, as opposed to my typical weekly post, and that is for several reasons.  First of all, I have a lot of book reviews to catch up on!  Secondly, school vacations are the perfect time for tweens and teens to read for fun, and I wanted to help out the people who might want/need extra suggestions.  Last but not least, I realized that I was inadvertently on a roll with books that took place in summer…  Since I still have a few more books that fit the bill, I decided it would make sense to  keep with it and to help us all escape the winter blues, one book review at a time.  :-)

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That Summer by Sarah Dessen

that summerAlthough my hubby and I are still sickeningly sweet on each other, I sometimes find my brain wandering and thinking about how it would change my life and/or the lives of our children if we were to get a divorce.  It’s not because I think it’s even a remote possibility, but rather because divorce is just so darn common.  I frequently hear about couples divorcing and how hard it is for the kids who are caught in the middle and have to adjust to a their “new normal.”  Since my parents are still married, as well, I can’t say for sure whether Haven’s experience rings true enough… but, based the popularity of Sarah Dessen’s many books, I can’t imagine she got it wrong! Continue reading

The Lost City of Z: A Tale of Deadly Obsession in the Amazon by David Grann

lost city of zI am not a huge reader of non-fiction.  For me to really get into a non-fiction title, it usually has to be about something I really care about (like Say Goodbye to Survival Mode) or read like fiction (like King of the Mild Frontier).  This fell into the latter category.  A friend had recommended this book to me when it first came out, but it kept getting pushed to the back burner.  Finally, I told myself that I needed to take a break from all the dystopias I was reading/listening to and dive into a non-fiction title.  I’m so glad I did!  The details were so vivid and David Grann wrote such a fantastic narrative that I thought to myself, several times, “This would make an awesome movie.  It’s like a real life Indiana Jones adventure!”  Imagine my shock and elation, then, when I heard [on the radio this morning] that it is going to be made into a movie… produced by Brad Pitt, no less.  So awesome! Continue reading