Category Archives: audiobook

FREE audiobook downloads?!?

syncIf you aren’t already downloading ebooks and audiobooks from your local library, you should probably get on that… like yesterday!  Once you have that established, though, there are additional sources of free downloadable ebooks and audiobooks you can look into.  And, if you love YA, you will love SYNC — http://www.audiobooksync.com — a free summer audiobook program for teens 13+.  I know I am technically not a teen anymore because the world prefers to see my age rather than my heart, but I think the “+” has me covered! 😉

This week’s selections are Egg & Spoon by Gregory Maguire and Every Last Word by Tamara Ireland Stone.  Though I already read Every Last Word, I totally loved it and may listen to it just to see how the experience compares.  I have always intended to read Egg & Spoon but still haven’t gotten around to it, so I will surely listen to that one first.  (And I am sure I will be reviewing it on this blog before the summer is over.)

Happy Reading!

These Broken Stars by Amie Kaufman

these-broken-starsThe Icarus is a luxury spaceliner; it’s basically an entire city flying through space at hyperspeed.  Many of the people aboard are among the social elite, but none are quite so famous as Lilac LaRoux — daughter of the man whose engineering company is responsible for the manufacturing of the Icarus, terraforming planets, etc.  It’s rather funny, then, that Tarver Merendsen — famous in his own right by his “war hero” status — doesn’t know with whom he is flirting when he meets Lilac.  All he really knows is that this girl is beautiful and not *quite* like the rest of the socialites he’s encountered.  After a brief period of flirtation, nevertheless, Lilac decides to shoot him down so that she can get the eventual heartbreak over with.

It’s rather unfortunate, therefore, when the Icarus experiences technical difficulties and Lilac and Tarver end up in the same escape pod.  Unsure where in the galaxy they could be, with very little in the way of supplies and without any way to contact anyone else, the two have to find a way to get along well enough to work together on both survival and coming up with a rescue plan.  My only complaint about this story is that we *know* right from the beginning that they will, in fact, get rescued.  (Based on the fact that Tarver is being grilled about his interactions with Miss LaRoux, there is no doubt that they will find a way to eventually communicate with someone back home and get picked up.  It was only a matter of when and how.)  I highly recommend this book to people who enjoyed Beth Revis’ Across the Universe trilogy.

Happy Reading!

Reckless by Cornelia Funke

recklessI first became acquainted with Cornelia Funke’s writing when I read Inkheart.  I quickly fell in love with her rich descriptions and quirky characters.  I was disappointed when that trilogy came to an end because I had so enjoyed living in that fantasy world with Meggie and Farid…  So how is it, then, that I managed not to read this book until nearly SIX years after it was published?  Let’s just say that I have a terrible habit of ordering books that are sure to be popular, based on book reviews and the reading tastes of my library’s patrons, and then not getting to them when I select my own reading materials.  I mean…  I *know* that I ordered Reckless and Fearless when I was still a full-time librarian, but I just didn’t manage to read them myself.  For the record — there are just WAY too many amazing authors out there for me to juggle these things in a way that won’t cause me distress! #LibrarianProblems

Fantasy readers who enjoy a blending of magic and the “real” world will definitely want to read this book.  Jacob Reckless has a magical mirror through which he can access another world.  He has always loved to go there to have adventures and to gather treasures he could bring back home, but his love for the Mirrorworld is tested when his brother, Will, sneaks through as well.  Will is cursed and begins transforming into a Goyl (a creature with skin made of stone).  With the help of his friend Fox — who can shapeshift between her human and fox forms, Jacob sets out to find a way to break the curse before it’s too late.

Happy Reading!

Etiquette and Espionage [Finishing School series] by Gail Carriger

etiquette and espionageLong-time readers of my blog have suffered through my constant lamentations that everything is a freaking series …  I sometimes read a book not realizing that it is the first in a series (ahem, Cinder) and just about die waiting for the rest of the series to be published.  Back when this book first came out, I knew it was part of a planned series and made the conscious decision to wait until after all of the books were out before I read it.  I had heard it was good and all, but I didn’t hear enough to lure me into actually cheating.  The final book of this series came out in November, so I decided I was ready to binge-read the series (well, binge-listen to the audiobooks) this winter.  Part of me is glad I didn’t have any major gaps of time in between the stories, but part of me is so mad at myself that I didn’t just suck it up and read these from the start.  Such is life, right?!?  Darned if you do, and darned if you don’t!

The Finishing School series is just so amazing that it’s hard to explain, but I will do my best to point out the various things I loved.  The cast of characters, both normal and nefarious, was fabulous.  I think I may have clicked with this series so quickly because Sophronia has a very Georgia Nicholson feel to her — awkward but lovable; smart but bumbling.  She’s awesome enough that readers might want to be like her and not so perfect as to be annoying, you know?  And although it’s a mystery and a fantasy that takes place in a finishing school, it is a lot sillier than Libba Bray’s [Gothic mystery] Gemma Doyle series.  It still had plenty of mystery, and there were conflicts with supernatural creatures aplenty, but there was a much lighter feel to it overall.  Readers who enjoyed the steampunk airships of Oppel’s Airborn series and Westerfeld’s Leviathan series will appreciate the fact that Mademoiselle Geraldine’s Finishing Academy for Young Ladies of Quality is held aboard a dirigible.  Not to mention the proliferation of gadgets, like exploding wicker chickens and mechanical wiener dogs!  If you like steampunk, supernatural mysteries, and/or tales of girls who don’t quite fit in with their high society families, I recommend you check this series out.

Happy Reading!

Carry On by Rainbow Rowell

carry-onWhen I read Fangirl last year, I fell hard for Simon, Baz, and the Watford School of Magicks.  I was desperate to read more than was revealed in Cath’s posts.  Fortunately, I happened upon an article about the impending publication of Carry On and knew it was only a matter of time before my wish would come true!  The only problem was that my requests for other books and audiobooks from the library kept showing up, so I kept putting this story off.  (It probably wouldn’t have been such a problem if I had gotten Carry On from the library and had a time limit, but I downloaded it from Audible and knew I had as long as I wanted. #firstworldproblems)

I think what I love most about Rowell’s writing is that it really nails all the nitty gritty, true-to-life details of adolescent friendships and romances.  Carry On was extra awesome because it had all that PLUS magic, mystery, and monsters!  The only things I found disappointing were that (a) I waited so long to actually listen to this audiobook, and (b) there was only one book! 😉  As a die-hard Potterhead, I really enjoyed comparing and contrasting the stories of Simon Snow and Harry Potter.  Some people have argued that this story is too derivative of Harry Potter, but I fully recognize that there are a great many “Chosen One” stories and that having similarities doesn’t make it a rip-off.  After all, some people say that Harry Potter is basically Star Wars!  And though I am not big on re-reading anything, since there are far too many books out there waiting to be read, I have a feeling I will listen to this audiobook (or maybe even read the book) at least one more time…

Happy Reading!

Hatchet by Gary Paulsen

hatchetI am almost embarrassed to admit that I had never read Hatchet before.  I’ve handed this book out to countless kids operating under the mistaken impression that I had actually read it back when I was in elementary school.  I mean, I clearly remember talking about it in 4th grade… But, as it turns out, I only knew the basic premise of the story and filled in the rest of my so-called memory with bits and pieces from another survival story we read at the time — My Side of the Mountain by Jean Craighead George.  Luckily, I decided to take the time to listen to this story to “refresh my memory” now that my son was reading it in school.  (Oops!)

Brian was a fairly typical “modern day” kid.  He spent most of his time on school and leisure activities, and he depended on adults much more than he ever realized.  He wasn’t fat, necessarily, but he wasn’t exactly fit either.  Finding food always meant going to the fridge or the pantry — at most, to a grocery store.  So, when his flight to visit his father for the summer ended with a crash in the Canadian wilderness, Brian was not sure he had what it would take to survive.  The only other passenger had been the pilot, and the plane crashed because the pilot had died of a heart attack.  With nothing more than the clothes on his back and the hatchet [a gift from his mom] on his belt, Brian had to find both shelter and food enough to last until he was rescued…  If he even *could* be rescued.  Because no one, including Brian, knew exactly where his plane went down.

It’s no wonder Hatchet is the “gold standard” for survival stories.  Paulsen masterfully balanced Brian’s hope and drive to survive with suspense surrounding the real-life dangers of the Canadian wilderness.  I think this book would be an excellent precursor to lessons on disaster preparedness and survival skills, and it’s also sure to be a hit with kids who already enjoy wilderness-based activities like hiking and camping.

Happy Reading!

Far Far Away by Tom McNeal

far far awayJeremy Johnson Johnson was rather unlucky.  Not only did his mom leave him and his dad, but his father became so crippled by depression that he became a total recluse.  Jeremy became, in essence, the adult of the household and started taking care of things to the best of his abilities.  After Jeremy was involved in a prank gone awry, though, he was ostracized by the townspeople who had previously given him enough work to get by.  With the final “balloon payment” of the mortgage on his father’s bookstore [aka his home] coming due very soon, Jeremy began to panic.  Fortunately, he had a friend, Ginger, who had a crazy plan and a guardian angel of sorts, Jacob, looking after him.  Whether he was actually an angel is debatable, but there was no doubt that Jeremy could definitely communicate with the ghost of Jacob Grimm — one of the famous Brothers Grimm.  Jacob was pretty sure he had not yet passed on completely because he still had a purpose on earth, and he was certain that his purpose was to keep Jeremy safe.  Readers who are familiar with Grimm fairy tales will surely guess that something “grim” is in the cards, but they’re not likely to guess exactly what until it’s already too late.  This clever combination of old-fashioned fairy tales and modern storytelling has plenty of suspense and plot twists to keep readers on the edge of their seats, and I’m glad I can finally settle back in mine again. :-)

Happy Reading!