Category Archives: mystery

The Young World by Chris Weitz

young-worldEver since I read The Girl Who Owned a City [back in fifth grade], I have been fairly obsessed with dystopian fiction.  There’s just something so intriguing about seeing that the world could be *even more* messed up than it already is, you know?  The thing about this story that instantly brought me back to The Girl Who Owned a City, of course, is the fact that the entire adult population in this story has been wiped out.  In this case, though, all the little kids have been wiped out too.  It’s only the teenagers who have survived — and it must have something to do with the particular blend of hormones that exists in teens, because even the survivors die off once they reach full maturity.

This is not just a random disease that struck and went away, by the way.  This is something that, if left unchecked, will wipe out the entire human race.  Yeah.  Let’s hope there are some super-genius teens out there who can figure out what to do to fix it all, right?!?  Enter the kids of Washington Square.  This story is told from the perspectives of various characters, including an “average” girl named Donna and a guy named Jefferson who has “inherited” leadership of Washington Square now that his older brother has turned 18 and died.  Oh yeah…  Jefferson is also secretly in love with Donna and just so happens to be think he might have found some information that could lead to a cure.  Jeff just needs to convince his friends to join him on a dangerous trip through the city to find more information and, you know, a lab where he can do some research.  Witty banter and fast-paced action make this a fairly quick read.  I recommend this book to fans of series like Hunger Games, Maze Runner, and Monument 14.

Happy Reading!

Harry Potter and the Cursed Child by John Tiffany, Jack Thorne, J.K. Rowling

cursed-childAnyone who knows me, pretty much at all, knows that I am a HUGE Harry Potter fan.  I mean, I have a tattoo that incorporates the Deathly Hallows, for goodness’ sake!  So, when this book was announced, I must have gotten a dozen emails from people who wanted to make sure I didn’t miss the news.  Even though I fully appreciated their thoughtfulness, part of me was like,”Do you  even *know* who you’re talking to?!?” 😉

Even though I was slightly concerned that the play format would significantly alter the reading experience, I am happy to report that it didn’t detract from the story at all [for me].  Perhaps that is because I was in the Drama Club in high school and was already used to reading scripts, but I believe that even non-thespians should do just fine with this story.  My one complaint?  It was too short!  I am one of the people who literally cried tears of joy to hear that there was another story in the Harry Potter universe, and then cried tears of despair that JK Rowling said this is definitely her last time writing about the world of Harry Potter.  (I can only hope she has a change of heart.)

This story is essentially a continuation of the epilogue from Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows.  And though it delves into the lives of all of the Weasley-Potters and the Granger-Weasleys, it focuses mostly around Harry and Ginny’s son Albus as he enters Hogwarts and tries to find his place in a world where he fears that he will only ever live in his father’s shadow.  This is not only a great coming-of-age story, and a touching story about the power of friendship, but it is also a wonderful reminder that we all need to rise above self-doubt if we are going to reach our full potential.

Happy Reading!

The Killer in Me by Margot Harrison

killer-in-meNina Barrows doesn’t like to sleep at night.  A few hours right before school and then a cat nap during the day is fine, but that is about all she is comfortable with.  Why?  Because falling asleep gives her the ability to connect with the mind of a serial killer who calls himself the Thief.  Nina is familiar with his family, his home, his work, and his methods of stalking and killing his prey.  When she was little, Nina tried to tell her mother about her connection with this older boy, but her mother just thought she had an imaginary friend.  As she got older, Nina realized that people might simply think she was crazy, so she decided not to talk about it any more.  But she wonders whether she might be able to stop him; if there might be some way to use her “power” for good.  There are just two problems with that, though…  One is that she needs to convince her former best friend, Warren, to help her track down the Thief.  And the other, of course, is the fact that she may be putting her own life in danger if she manages to find him.

Warren is not so sure that he believes in this psychic connection, but he admits that there are an awful lot of coincidences and he doesn’t want Nina to go off completely on her own.  Nina starts to doubt herself, once Warren has sown some seeds of doubt, but she is insistent on following through to see if this man really is the dangerous sociopath, the Thief, she has seen in her dreams.  This psychological thriller has so many twists and turns that it will surely keep you guessing all the way until the end.

Happy Reading!

Fuzzy by Tom Angleberger and Paul Dellinger

fuzzyI have several lenses through which I view the education system in our country.  First, as a former student.  Second, as someone who has completed a bachelor’s degree in elementary education and a master’s degree in library and information sciences with a concentration in youth services and public libraries.  Third, nevertheless, is the role that has provided me a completely different [admittedly, more biased] view — mom to two children in public school.  Based on my own experiences, the training I have received, the literature I’ve studied on best practices, the work I have done in schools and public libraries, and the ways I have seen my own children navigate the system, I feel extremely confident in my ability to speak about both the successes and shortcomings of recent educational reforms.  And while I feel as though most of the reform in the last couple of decades was well-intentioned, I am both concerned about and disappointed by the general trend toward extreme standardization and hands-off learning because of the focus on high-stakes testing.  This book spoke right to my heart!

Imagine that the school you attended had an all-seeing, computerized Vice Principal who could track every single student’s educational progress and behavior in real time.  For Max, this is her reality.  Every time her grades slip, every time she is late to class, and every time she breaks even the tiniest of school rules, the Vice Principal (aka computerized student tracking/evaluation system) Barbara updates Max’s student record.  That might not be so bad if it weren’t for the fact that Barbara also constantly notifies Max’s parents, who are stressing big time and pressuring Max to turn things around before she ends up kicked out of her regular middle school and enrolled in a remedial program.  School is nothing but stress for Max… but then Fuzzy shows up.

Fuzzy is a new student at Vanguard One Middle School.  The thing that makes him different, nevertheless, is that he is not human; he is a robot.  Sure, the school already had robots who perform routine janitorial and cafeteria work, but Fuzzy is something very new.  Instead of being programmed for only a few specific jobs and functions, he is programmed with “fuzzy logic” so that he can attempt to adapt his code to the demands of being a middle school student.  To help him with his mission, Max has been recruited as a student partner with whom he can interact.  She agrees to help Fuzzy better understand the intricacies of navigating middle school, both literally and figuratively, and Fuzzy “decides” he wants to help Max as well.  In a world where it seems like administrators would rather their students behave more like robots, you would think that Fuzzy would be welcomed with open arms.  But it seems that Barbara is not a fan of the new Robot Integration Program.  Perhaps it’s because she’s afraid Fuzzy will catch on to the fact that she seems to be so obsessed with better test scores that she may be taking liberties with student evaluations?

Happy Reading!

The Unwanteds by Lisa McMann

unwantedsChildren in the land of Quill are raised in a perpetual state of fear.  They are expected to live by very rigid rules and too many instances of rule breaking could get them labeled as an Unwanted.  Being told that you are “unwanted” may sound cruel in and of itself, but it’s actually much worse than that.  There is an annual Purge, and the 13-year-olds are separated into Wanteds, Necessaries, and Unwanteds.  All of the Unwanteds are then rounded up and sent to the Death Farm.  So, what are these infractions that are worthy of getting a child sentenced to death?  Anything creative, for starters — drawing and singing are absolutely not allowed.  It is also particularly bad if a child displays any curiosity or, worse yet, questions authority and/or the status quo.  After all, “Quill prevails when the strong survive.”

Alex has known for a long time that he was an Unwanted and that his twin brother, Aaron, was a Wanted.  Though he knew that Aaron could have been labeled Unwanted right along with him, he accepted the blame for his brother’s drawing to keep him safe.  Imagine Alex’s surprise, then, when he got to the Death Farm and discovered that it was actually a ruse.  Mr. Today pretended to be the executioner of the Unwanteds, but he was actually a wizard who created a hidden land, Artime, in which the Unwanteds were encouraged to find their happiness and express their creativity.  Had he only known the truth, he would have turned his brother in and actually saved him!  Sadly, he is now forbidden to have any contact with his brother.  They are ALL forbidden from returning to [or even contacting anyone in] Quill because it would surely endanger the entire land of Artime and all the people living there if the leaders of Quill learned that they had been fooled.  But, how can he simply leave his brother in that terrible place?  Especially knowing that another boy in Artime is looking for a way to sneak back into Quill to get revenge on Aaron.  Surely there must be a way to save him…

Happy Reading!

Holding Smoke by Elle Cosimano

holding-smokeJohn “Smoke” Conlan is serving time at a juvenile detention center known to most simply as the Y.  He’s there because he was convicted of murdering two people — but he didn’t really kill his teacher, Mrs. Cruz, and the boy he killed was an accident.  That boy, by the way, happened to be the only other witness to Mrs. Cruz’ murder.  Ack!  (John feels so guilty about both of those deaths, though, he doesn’t really feel like he deserves any better than the Y.)

John earned the nickname “Smoke” because he seems to have the ability to go anywhere and see anything.  No one knows quite how he manages to get all the information he does, but they’re more than happy to enlist his services.  In truth, people probably wouldn’t believe him if he told them.   You see, ever since his near death experience, John has had the ability to separate himself from his body and to navigate through the world in a ghostly form.  That was how he witnessed Mrs. Cruz’ murder in the first place, and that is how he gets information for other people at the Y.  If it wasn’t for a run-in with a girl he calls Pink, who can see and communicate with him, he probably would have given up on himself completely.  But, because Pink seems to believe in him — and because he wants to protect her, since she wound up in danger after visiting him at the Y — John finds the courage to search a little harder and to try and clear his name…

Happy Reading!

Vivian Apple at the End of the World by Katie Coyle

Vivian-AppleAlthough Vivian Apple never really believed in the teachings of the Church of America, she was forced to re-evaluate when her beliefs when her parents disappeared — especially after she found holes in their bedroom ceiling the morning after the predicted “Rapture.”  She always thought that The Book of Frick (named after the man who created the Church of America) was a bit over the top — especially considering the fact that it touted conservative behaviors and traditional gender roles but claimed that God loved America best because of its capitalistic tendencies.  At times, it was hard to tell if this book was intended to be a parody or simply an exaggerated to make a point.  What I know for sure, nevertheless, is that I’ve never read anything quite like it.  A strong female character who is examining her beliefs while navigating through changing friendships, a developing romance, and the end of the world?  Sign me up!

Happy Reading!