Category Archives: sports

Divided We Fall by Trent Reedy

divided-we-fallDanny Wright signed up for the Army National Guard when he was 17 years old because he felt compelled to both serve his country and to honor the memory of his father, who died while serving in the Army.  At first, he was proud to wear his uniform and excited to get to train with high-powered guns… but that all changed only a short time after he finished bootcamp.  Why?  He was called in by the Governor of Idaho to help with protests in Boise (about a proposed new federal ID card) and things got very out of hand very quickly.  One accidental shot turned into a firefight in which civilians were injured and killed, and people started making comparisons to the Kent State shootings that took place during a Vietnam War protest in 1970.  Knowing that he fired the shot that started it all, and seeing how quickly people snapped to pass judgement when they did not have all the facts, he was glad that the Governor pledged to protect the identities of the guardsmen who were involved.  But, how long would the Governor be able to protect them when the President of the United States of America was demanding answers?

I especially appreciated the way Reedy worked in both extreme news coverage and polarized social media reactions.  I was impressed to see a YA novel tackle the very complex topic of federal government/federal laws vs state government/states’ rights, but the audiobook impressed me even more.  Much like Countdown, this audiobook uses a variety of sound effects and multiple readers to create sound bites that mimic news broadcasts and to set apart the non-narrative portions of the book.  The only “down side” to listening to this audiobook all at once (on a road trip) was that the “near future” setting seemed entirely too plausible and actually made me feel a little anxious as if I were really listening to the news.  :-/

Happy Reading!

The Sky between You and Me by Catherine Alene

sky-betweenRaesha is not the stereotypical girl with an eating disorder from the “after school specials” of my youth.  She isn’t the super-popular girl who is afraid to lose it all if she gains a few pounds, nor is she the unpopular fat girl who thinks that she will finally be accepted by her peers if she loses some weight.  This story is much more realistic, so I think it’s only fair to provide a *TRIGGER WARNING* for people recovering from eating disorders.

While Raesha doesn’t set out to be anorexic, she is so dedicated to making it to (and winning) Nationals that she decides to lose a few pounds.  After all, being lighter will mean that her horse can run faster.  The worst thing is that she isn’t pressured by anyone else to compete in barrel racing but rather competes to honor the memory of her mother.  Between grieving for her mother and her father’s frequent absences (for work), Raesha is often very lonely.  And, with the change in behavior that accompanies her eating disorder, she only drives her boyfriend and her friends further away.  I would recommend this book for Ellen Hopkins fans and readers of Laurie Halse Anderson’s Wintergirls.

Happy Reading!

Click’d by Tamara Ireland Stone

clickdAllie Navarro went away to a CodeGirls summer camp where she learned how to create her very own app, and she was super excited to share it with her friends when she came back home.  Even more exciting?  She would have the opportunity to enter her app into the upcoming G4G (Games for Good) competition!  Her app was eligible because it helped people to find other people near them with whom they “clicked” even if they didn’t know each other yet.  Basically, it was a friend finder and it worked to make the world a less lonely place.

Through a series of questions, much like online dating websites, Click’d was able to match people by their interests.  This way, the kids in her middle school (and anywhere else her app spread) would be able to get to know people outside of their usual friend groups.  When you finished the questionnaire, you would get access to a leaderboard of the top 10 users with whom you Click’d — and then the app would send you on a scavenger hunt to find them!  The app utilized the phones’ geolocation functions to tell people when they were near a match with a series of “bloops” and flashing lights — and then it gave users a photo clue pulled from the user’s public Instagram feed.  Or, at least, that was what was supposed to happen.  Somehow, though, there was a glitch that accidentally utilized private photos from the users’ phones some of the time.  Would she be able to fix it in time to present at G4G?  Would she just present it without admitting to the coding error?  Definitely a good conversation starter about honesty and integrity.

I like the fact that this story raised issues about privacy and phone/internet safety concerns without resorting to R-rated problems.  There were embarrassing photos and screenshots of conversations that were supposed to be secret, but no sex acts or nudity involved.  I am not sure whether that was done intentionally so that parents, teachers, and librarians would feel more comfortable sharing this book with younger tweens, but it certainly doesn’t hurt.  I appreciated that there were no quick fixes, lots of hard work, and plenty of growing pains as the story worked up to the G4G competition.  I also loved the fact that it concluded with a happy yet realistic ending.   I thought that since my own middle-schooler is away at a computer programming summer camp this week, reading (and reviewing) this book was definitely apropos!  And, though the book will not officially be released until early September, I think I might just offer to let him read my ARC when he returns.  🙂

Happy Reading!

Ready Player One by Ernest Cline

ready-player-one As a child of the 80s (having been born in 1979), this book felt so much like coming home.  All of the references to 80s pop culture, especially geek culture, were just so spot-on!  I was not an arcade kid, since we didn’t have an arcade close enough to my house, but I definitely played more than my fair share of video games on personal gaming consoles like the Atari 2600 and NES.  I also have fond memories of playing puzzle and sim games on the Commodore 64 and Mac Classic in “computer class” at school.  I also watched waaaaaay too much TV and too many movies, so most of Cline’s references felt like a conversation with an old friend.  It’s beyond obvious that Ernest Cline was a fellow geek and that he loved all the cheeseball 80s stuff just as much as my friends and I did.  For real…  If you are a fanboy/fangirl of geeky 80s pop culture, you NEED to read this book!

Even better than the reminiscing, though, was the foreshadowing of what could come to be if we (citizens of the world) don’t change our reliance on fossil fuels and unplug a little from the world of “social media” to actually interact with the people and the world around us — in real life!  Imagine, if you will, a future in which most people around the world are so immersed in a virtual reality “utopia” known as the OASIS that they rarely leave their houses.  Since most people no longer have their own vehicles or even the financial means to utilize public transportation, the OASIS was the closest thing they would ever get to traveling.  Kids even started to attend school in the OASIS because the virtual world created it’s own schools to let pressure off of the failing public school system.  When I read one quote, I wondered if Cline was really just that attuned to the forthcoming changes in our society back in 2011 or if he somehow traveled through time to 2016 before he finished his story — “Now that everyone could vote from home, via the OASIS, the only people who could get elected were movie stars, reality TV personalities, or radical televangelists.”

One of the creators of the OASIS, James Halliday, had very few friends and never married or had any children.  By the time of his death, he had even been estranged from his former business partner and one-time best friend for about a decade.  So, before he died, he crafted an elaborate “Easter Egg” hunt within his virtual world to determine who would receive his fortune.  Halliday’s last will and testament was announced to the world with a video chock-full of 80s references and explained that his heir would need to use their knowledge of Halliday’s favorite things to puzzle out the location of three keys and three gates/trials he had programmed into the OASIS.  Everyone went nuts at first, but excitement waned after the first five years and only hardcore Gunters (a condensation of “egg hunters”) like Wade kept up the hunt.  When Wade finds the first key and his name shows up on the leader board, though, the OASIS is suddenly hopping again and the competition stirs up adventure, danger, and even romance. I can’t wait to see how the movie of this book turns out…

Happy Reading!

 

The Other F-Word by Natasha Friend

other-f-wordMilo’s moms are really great, but he sometimes wonders what life would be like with a mom and dad instead of two moms.  I mean, he loves his moms and all.  And he knows that they love him too.  But he just feels like they don’t “get” him sometimes and that maybe a dad, by virtue of also being a guy, would understand him more.  So, when Milo’s doctor suggests that genetic testing of his biological father could help develop a better treatment plan for his insanely varied and severe allergies, Milo latches onto the opportunity to find his bio dad.  The first step of which is to reach out to his half-sister, Hollis, whom he had met as a young child.  Hollis also had lesbian mothers who used the same sperm donor, which is how they came to meet in the first place, but she wasn’t really interested in finding her dad.  Nevertheless, reconnecting with Milo and his moms seemed to be the first thing to make Hollis’ mom, Leigh, happy since Hollis’ other mom, Pam, died years before… So, she decided to roll with it and see how things turned out.

What started out as a suggestion to request genetic testing relating to Milo’s allergies quickly morphed into something else.  After posting to a message board for the clinic their moms had used, Milo and Hollis discovered that they had three more half-siblings.  What were they like?  Would they get along?  Would they be able to work together and find their donor/dad?  What would this new “f-word” (family) look like in the end?!?

Happy Reading!

It Started With Goodbye by Christina June

started-with-goodbyeHave you ever been in the wrong place at the wrong time?  If so, you’ll probably empathize with the crazy mess Tatum got herself into.  She went on a shopping trip with her best friend, Ashlyn, and Ashlyn’s boyfriend tagged along.  Sick of watching them make out, she decided to purchase her own items and wait out front, in her car, for them to finish up and join her.  When they came out, though, they were followed by security — because Ashlyn’s boyfriend had been shoplifting.  It didn’t matter that Tatum wasn’t in on his plan.  She and Ashlyn were with him, so they were arrested too.  Not only did she receive a large fine and compulsory community service, but she and Ashlyn stopped talking after she agreed to give testimony for a lighter sentence.

Despite the fact that she didn’t “do” anything, her father grounded her (pretty much indefinitely) right before he left town for business.  Can you imagine?  Just for being in the wrong place at the wrong time, her entire summer was ruined.  When she wasn’t out doing her community service, she was stuck on house arrest with her stepmother, Belén — who seemed to hate her and to look for any and every opportunity to punish her — and her stepsister, Tilly.  Tilly basically existed solely to dance [ballet], and was the apple of her mother’s eye, so it was kind of a given that the girls didn’t form any sort of sisterly bond.  There were two bright spots in this whole mess, though.  First of all, her step-abuela, Blanche, would be coming to stay for the summer.  Even though Blanche was coming to help keep an eye on Tatum, she seemed to be more of a “fairy grandmother” than a warden.  Second, there was the fact that Tatum would have plenty of time to spend on her web design skills and creating a company/portfolio to use for her college applications.

Although there were obvious Cinderella vibes, this story didn’t feel like it was *just* a modernized retelling.  I loved the diverse cast of characters, the look into the complications of blended families, the realistic teen angst, and the swoon-worthy romance.  I recommend this book to readers who enjoy contemporary romances by authors like Sarah Dessen, Carolyn Mackler, and Sara Zarr.

Happy Reading!

The Seventh Wish by Kate Messner

seventh-wishThis is a book that I might have overlooked, had it not been for Facebook.  You see, I was scrolling through my feed recently and happened across a story about an author’s Skype visit that fell through.  On January 17th, Kate Messner posted:

This afternoon, I  had to cancel a Skype visit about THE SEVENTH WISH because the teacher doesn’t want to mention the fact that the main character’s older sister is fighting opioid addiction. She told me that in her class read-aloud, she’s been ‘skipping’ the parts of the story that deal with that, so while the students are aware that there’s a drug issue, most of them think it’s probably marijuana. I told her I wasn’t comfortable with misleading kids in my presentation and suggested that she share the author’s note, which offers a factual and kid-friendly explanation of what opioid drugs are, how they affect the brain, and why they have such a devastating effect on families like Charlie’s.

She opted to cancel the visit instead. She’s never known anyone with a drug issue and believes she’s doing what’s right for her students. She was very kind in her emails, but I have to admit, I’m crushed. I can’t tell you how sad this makes me, mostly for the kids in that class who might already be living in a situation like Charlie’s.

If you have the opportunity to share THE SEVENTH WISH by recommending to a teacher or for a state list or really anywhere, I’d truly appreciate that. I so wish more kids who need this story could have access to it.

I was heartbroken to see that those kids were misled, despite the fact that their teacher had good intentions.  Research shows that it’s best for adults to have an open and ongoing conversation about topics like drug abuse starting at an early age, rather than “having the talk” in adolescence.  Parents and caregivers should look for spontaneous/everyday situations and teachable moments to start open and honest conversations.  In this story, we get a nice combination of of fantasy (Charlie finds a magical wishing fish), Irish culture (Charlie is very involved in Irish Dancing), and some important teachable moments (Charlie’s older sister has been using heroin).  I appreciated the fact that this story didn’t only focus on the drug problem but rather incorporated the problem into how it affected the rest of Charlie’s life, so that it felt much more genuine.  There were times when you could sort of forget what Charlie’s sister was going through, and I think that is very true to how it might be for a person whose family member is battling addiction.  It seems to take over sometimes, but there are moments when you can actually get caught up in the joy and madness of everyday life.

In good news, Kate posted yesterday:

I’m so looking forward to my school visit today. It’s in Brandon, Vermont, where THE SEVENTH WISH was chosen by the entire school district (Rutland Northeast) as a community read for 5th and 6th grade students, in collaboration with Brandon Cares, a local organization responding to the region’s opioid crisis.

This book is a perfect “teachable moment,” and I applaud the Rutland Northeast School District for choosing it as their community read!  Considering the fact that there is a major opioid epidemic all around our country, and not just in Vermont, I think it is important that this book get into the hands of as many people as possible.  Please do your part by reading this book and then passing it along to parents, teachers, and middle grade readers.  I don’t often buy books, since I am a librarian and can’t really afford my reading habit, but I just ordered a copy of this book to add to my personal library so that I can share it with my own children and pass it around to other young people who might benefit (with their parents’ permission, of course).

Happy Reading!