This Is Where the World Ends by Amy Zhang

where-the-world-endsMicah and Janie have been best friends since elementary school… Not that anyone would ever suspect, though, because their friendship has been one of their best-kept secrets.  After all, Janie is one of the popular girls and Micah is a bit of a social outcast.  They seem to be opposites in every way, but it “works” for them.  I found it strange to see how confident Micah was that Janie would always be there for him even though he knew better than to even try to talk to her at school.  Ack!  Talk about a terrible friendship.  I will say, though, that there are probably plenty of so-called friendships like this, since adolescents are often willing to compromise their own feelings and integrity for the sake of fitting in and/or feeling wanted.  The biggest problem with this arrangement, nevertheless, was when Micah woke up in the hospital with no recollection of how or why Janie went missing.  All he seemed to remember was a big party and a bonfire… But where did Janie go, and why won’t she even answer his texts?

I recommend this story to readers who enjoyed the Jennifer Hubbard’s The Secret Year, John Green’s Paper Towns, and E. Lockhart’s We Were Liars.  Though these stories are all unique, there is just a little something about Zhang’s characters, plot, and/or storytelling methodology that reminded me of these books.

Happy Reading!

Lily and Dunkin by Donna Gephart

lily-and-dunkinI was thinking about saving this review for Pride Month, but current events lead me to believe people need to read this book NOW!  Why?  Because it is not only working to #EndTheStigma of mental illness with a realistic portrayal of a teen boy who has bipolar disorder (Dunkin), but it also details the struggles — both internal and external — of a trans girl (Lily).  I am not trying to make light of Dunkin’s struggles, because he does truly struggle with finding a balance between feeling like himself and properly controlling his bipolar disorder with medication and therapy, let alone feeling like he needs to hide his diagnosis from his peers… but I am going to focus mostly on Lily for this review because think fewer people recognize the difficulties faced by the trans (T) portion of the GLBTQ community.

Imagine looking in the mirror and seeing a reflection that doesn’t match the *real* you — the person  you know, in your heart, you were born to be.  Even as a small child, Lily always knew she was really a girl.  But, she was born with a penis and labeled a boy at birth.  Her parents named her Timothy McGrother, but she would much rather people call her Lily Jo McGrother.  In fact, her mother once walked in on her trying to cut off her penis with a pair of nail clippers after her bath because she felt so certain that it didn’t belong.  Can you imagine the pain of hearing the “wrong” name or pronoun all the time; even from your own father?  Can you imagine the embarrassment of being forced to use the bathroom and locker room of the “opposite” gender?  How painful would it be to be scolded for painting your nails, growing your hair long, or trying to wear a dress outside of your home when you just want to feel pretty?

Adolescence was painful enough as a cisgender girl; I can’t even imagine the additional complications of being transgender.  Between the lack of acceptance and the outright discrimination and bullying they face, it’s no wonder 1 in 3 transgender youth try to commit suicide.  I think it is very important, therefore, for people to get the word out about stories like Lily and Dunkin. Not only so cisgender kids (and adults) can better empathize, but also so that transgender kids can see that they are not alone.  #WeNeedDiverseBooks because we need to #ProtectTransKids.

Happy Reading!

It Started With Goodbye by Christina June

started-with-goodbyeHave you ever been in the wrong place at the wrong time?  If so, you’ll probably empathize with the crazy mess Tatum got herself into.  She went on a shopping trip with her best friend, Ashlyn, and Ashlyn’s boyfriend tagged along.  Sick of watching them make out, she decided to purchase her own items and wait out front, in her car, for them to finish up and join her.  When they came out, though, they were followed by security — because Ashlyn’s boyfriend had been shoplifting.  It didn’t matter that Tatum wasn’t in on his plan.  She and Ashlyn were with him, so they were arrested too.  Not only did she receive a large fine and compulsory community service, but she and Ashlyn stopped talking after she agreed to give testimony for a lighter sentence.

Despite the fact that she didn’t “do” anything, her father grounded her (pretty much indefinitely) right before he left town for business.  Can you imagine?  Just for being in the wrong place at the wrong time, her entire summer was ruined.  When she wasn’t out doing her community service, she was stuck on house arrest with her stepmother, Belén — who seemed to hate her and to look for any and every opportunity to punish her — and her stepsister, Tilly.  Tilly basically existed solely to dance [ballet], and was the apple of her mother’s eye, so it was kind of a given that the girls didn’t form any sort of sisterly bond.  There were two bright spots in this whole mess, though.  First of all, her step-abuela, Blanche, would be coming to stay for the summer.  Even though Blanche was coming to help keep an eye on Tatum, she seemed to be more of a “fairy grandmother” than a warden.  Second, there was the fact that Tatum would have plenty of time to spend on her web design skills and creating a company/portfolio to use for her college applications.

Although there were obvious Cinderella vibes, this story didn’t feel like it was *just* a modernized retelling.  I loved the diverse cast of characters, the look into the complications of blended families, the realistic teen angst, and the swoon-worthy romance.  I recommend this book to readers who enjoy contemporary romances by authors like Sarah Dessen, Carolyn Mackler, and Sara Zarr.

Happy Reading!

The Seventh Wish by Kate Messner

seventh-wishThis is a book that I might have overlooked, had it not been for Facebook.  You see, I was scrolling through my feed recently and happened across a story about an author’s Skype visit that fell through.  On January 17th, Kate Messner posted:

This afternoon, I  had to cancel a Skype visit about THE SEVENTH WISH because the teacher doesn’t want to mention the fact that the main character’s older sister is fighting opioid addiction. She told me that in her class read-aloud, she’s been ‘skipping’ the parts of the story that deal with that, so while the students are aware that there’s a drug issue, most of them think it’s probably marijuana. I told her I wasn’t comfortable with misleading kids in my presentation and suggested that she share the author’s note, which offers a factual and kid-friendly explanation of what opioid drugs are, how they affect the brain, and why they have such a devastating effect on families like Charlie’s.

She opted to cancel the visit instead. She’s never known anyone with a drug issue and believes she’s doing what’s right for her students. She was very kind in her emails, but I have to admit, I’m crushed. I can’t tell you how sad this makes me, mostly for the kids in that class who might already be living in a situation like Charlie’s.

If you have the opportunity to share THE SEVENTH WISH by recommending to a teacher or for a state list or really anywhere, I’d truly appreciate that. I so wish more kids who need this story could have access to it.

I was heartbroken to see that those kids were misled, despite the fact that their teacher had good intentions.  Research shows that it’s best for adults to have an open and ongoing conversation about topics like drug abuse starting at an early age, rather than “having the talk” in adolescence.  Parents and caregivers should look for spontaneous/everyday situations and teachable moments to start open and honest conversations.  In this story, we get a nice combination of of fantasy (Charlie finds a magical wishing fish), Irish culture (Charlie is very involved in Irish Dancing), and some important teachable moments (Charlie’s older sister has been using heroin).  I appreciated the fact that this story didn’t only focus on the drug problem but rather incorporated the problem into how it affected the rest of Charlie’s life, so that it felt much more genuine.  There were times when you could sort of forget what Charlie’s sister was going through, and I think that is very true to how it might be for a person whose family member is battling addiction.  It seems to take over sometimes, but there are moments when you can actually get caught up in the joy and madness of everyday life.

In good news, Kate posted yesterday:

I’m so looking forward to my school visit today. It’s in Brandon, Vermont, where THE SEVENTH WISH was chosen by the entire school district (Rutland Northeast) as a community read for 5th and 6th grade students, in collaboration with Brandon Cares, a local organization responding to the region’s opioid crisis.

This book is a perfect “teachable moment,” and I applaud the Rutland Northeast School District for choosing it as their community read!  Considering the fact that there is a major opioid epidemic all around our country, and not just in Vermont, I think it is important that this book get into the hands of as many people as possible.  Please do your part by reading this book and then passing it along to parents, teachers, and middle grade readers.  I don’t often buy books, since I am a librarian and can’t really afford my reading habit, but I just ordered a copy of this book to add to my personal library so that I can share it with my own children and pass it around to other young people who might benefit (with their parents’ permission, of course).

Happy Reading!

The Sun is Also a Star by Nicola Yoon

sun-is-also-a-starNatasha is extremely practical.  She believes in science and cold, hard facts.  She knows that is it unlikely that she will be able to keep her family from being deported back to Jamaica now that her father’s DUI has alerted the authorities to their illegal status, but she also knows that she’s willing to hope and dream a little if it means that she might find a way for her family to stay in the US.  Even though she has only about 12 hours left, she’s on her way to a meeting about a possible “fix”…

Daniel has always wanted to be more of a dreamer and a poet, but he has instead done his best to live up to the standards of a “good son” as laid out by his Korean-American [legal] immigrant parents.  They expect him to go to Yale, to study to become a doctor, and to marry a good Korean girl so that he will never have to struggle as they once did.  Even though he is not sure he really wants to go to Yale, he’s on his way to an interview with a Yale alum…

When Natasha and Daniel randomly meet in New York City, neither of them is out looking for love.  A serious of seemingly random events — is it coincidence or fate? — brings them together, though.  Daniel falls for Natasha pretty quickly, but her practicality has her thinking he’s just crazy.  Although she doesn’t want to admit it at first, there *IS* something about Daniel that really speaks to her.  So, does that mean Natasha will fall for Daniel too?  Or will he end up heartbroken?  Can Natasha find a way to stay in the US?  Or will her family really have to leave in less than a day?  Will Daniel get into Yale?  And if he does, will he even go?  This audiobook had me so anxious that I found it nearly impossible to shut off even when I had real-life responsibilities to tend to!  I especially loved the fact that it was narrated by Natasha, Daniel, and the Universe — interspersed with narrations by some of the people they encounter throughout the day.  Not only is it a great story for the hopeless romantic in us all, but it’s an amazing look at how people’s interactions with one another might seem insignificant at the time even though they make a big difference in the long run.

Happy Reading!

The Best Possible Answer by E. Katherine Kottaras

Best possible answerViviana Rabinovich-Lowe, aka Viv, was a model student and daughter for most of her life. As she headed toward the penultimate year of her high school career, nevertheless, her life began falling apart. The beginning of the end was when she fell in love with the wrong guy and trusted him with a rather personal (::ahem:: nude) photo of herself. After the breakdown that resulted from the photo being shared all over social media, Viv’s life started to unravel even further… Her parents no longer trusted her, she didn’t really have many friends, and panic attacks crept up out of nowhere. Because her grades started to suffer, too, she feared that she would never get into a good college and had ruined her life entirely. And, just when it seemed things couldn’t get any worse, Viv realized that her parents’marriage was beyond saving — but had no idea how to break the news to her mother.

Not only does this story serve as a great warning of the dangers of sexting, but it is also a great examination of the power of love, trust, friendship, and self-forgiveness. I can only hope this book makes it into the hands of the young people who need it.

Happy Reading!

Lincoln’s Grave Robbers by Steve Sheinkin

Lincoln's Grave RobbersWhen I first heard about this book, I just couldn’t believe it.  How was it possible that there was a plot to steal Abraham Lincoln’s body from his grave and yet I had never even heard about it?  I admit that I was not the best history student; I much preferred math and science because I was terrible at memorizing all those names, dates, and places… but this is something I’m sure I would have remembered!  It didn’t surprise me in the least to see the depth and breadth of historical information that was included, since I’ve read other Steve Sheinkin books and listened to him speak about his research methods.  But I was definitely impressed  by the fact that, once again, he crafted a non-fiction book that read much more like a thriller than a textbook.  This is a great read for anyone who is interested in learning more about the early days of the Secret Service, money counterfeiting, and other [not always so] “organized crime” in the late 1800s.

Happy Reading!